Keep your teen's online life from causing school trouble Many teens record their personal thoughts in blogs, videos or social media posts. But these are not the same as a private diary. They can be read by people all over the internet. To avoid trouble at school, make sure your teen knows she should never post (even as a joke) threats to harm school staff, students or property. This includes harming a person's reputation. She should never suggest breaking the law. And unless assigned to do so by a teacher, she should avoid posting during school hours or on school computers. http://niswc.com/36kZC276091
6 days ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Team up with the teacher to tackle problems By now, you are probably aware of any issues your child is having with school and learning. But you may not always know how to address them. Her teacher is ready to help. Ask for a conference, in person, online or over the phone. Share your concerns and ask what the teacher has observed. Together, plan what you and the school can do to help. If necessary, meet again. Never give up on your child. http://niswc.com/16kWC276091
6 days ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
How to boost social skills while social distancing Many parents are wondering how their children can develop social skills during a pandemic. But many of these important social skills can be taught at home. Role-play being friendly, honest and a good listener with your child. When you play games together, teach her to be a good sport. You can promote skills like cooperation and compromise by doing projects together, such as making a family dinner. http://niswc.com/16kPC276091 _______________________________________________________________ Ask your child to help with holiday plans Don't worry if you can't reproduce past holiday celebrations this year. Instead, create some new traditions with your child. Participating in family rituals gives kids a sense of belonging. Together, decide what you will eat and what to do for family fun. Plan decorations your child can make. Think about ways everyone can help prepare and clean up. Your child will get a boost from seeing plans through and helping the family. http://niswc.com/16kUC276091
13 days ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Recharge your teen's fading motivation It's not uncommon for students' motivation to decline a few months into the school year. To revive your teen's momentum, encourage him to set small, achievable goals. Suggest that he choose a small reward, such as texting a friend or taking a quick walk, that he will give himself when he finishes a task. And urge him to set and live up to personal standards. He should strive to do his best, not just enough to get by. http://niswc.com/36kJC276091 __________________________________________________________________ Know what to do if your teen faces suspension If you learn that your teen could be suspended, what should you do? Know the school rules. Get the facts of the matter, from both the school and your teen. Keep records, such as letters from the school and notes of your discussions. They will be helpful if the problem continues. But don't get angry or be in denial. Your teen may really need help. And don't panic. Most suspended students never break the rules again. http://niswc.com/36kLC276091
20 days ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Support your child through fourth grade challenges Fourth grade can be a challenge for elementary school students. In the early grades, teachers focus on basic skills. But in fourth grade, students must use what they know. They generally tackle bigger projects and do more writing. To support your child, stay positive and establish a regular study time. Encourage him to set weekly goals and break big assignments into smaller chunks. http://niswc.com/16kIC276091 __________________________________________________________________ Make time for fun, relaxing reading Helping with schoolwork isn't the only way to support your child's education. One of the best things you can do is to encourage him to read for fun and relaxation. Print out a story he can read in the bathtub. Cozy up under a blanket and read by flashlight. To find more time, limit recreational screen time and offer reading as a replacement. The first two weeks may be hard, but it will get easier. http://niswc.com/16kOC276091
20 days ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
In school or online, every class matters Teens don't decide to drop out of school in just one day. They check out little by little, until they feel so disconnected that they decide not to return. It usually starts with skipping classes. If your teen has started skipping, talk to her about the importance attending every class. Express your confidence in her ability to learn, and if she's struggling, encourage her to work with the teacher to get back on track. http://niswc.com/36kEC276091 _____________________________________________________________________ For email/Facebook: Help your teen relax about math tests Math tests make many students anxious. Knowing some test-taking strategies can help. Tell your teen to look the test over before beginning to answer, and to put checks beside problems he knows he can do. He should solve those problems first. If he gets stuck on a problem when doing the rest, he should move on until he's answered everything he can. Remind your teen that he'll get the most credit if he shows all his work. http://niswc.com/36kFC276091
27 days ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Three daily ways to support your child From day to day, you may be helping your child with schoolwork in many different ways. But three things, according to research, will help every day. The first is making class attendance a priority, whether your child is learning at home or at school. The second is reading together. The third is managing recreational screen time. When the school day is over, turn off the screens and encourage your child to read, play games, exercise or think. http://niswc.com/16kBC276091 ____________________________________________________________________ Accomplishment is worth a little struggle If you rush to solve your child's every problem, you send the message that you don't think he can manage by himself. When kids work problems out for themselves, it makes them feel competent and confident. That's why sometimes, it's best to let your child struggle through a problem on his own. Offer support and encouragement ("I know you can figure this out"), and then give him some space. http://niswc.com/16kEC276091
27 days ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
How to help when your child is frustrated Statements like, "I hate school!" or "I'm dumb!" are often signs that a child is frustrated with schoolwork. To help your child in this situation, share a story of how you struggled with something when you were young. Explain how you worked through it. Ask guiding questions to help him come up with strategies he could use. Then encourage him to try again. If frustration persists, let the teacher know. http://niswc.com/16jZC276091
about 1 month ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Find out what your teen thinks When you ask your teen questions about what he thinks, not only do you show you care, you also learn more about his preferences, concerns and needs. And he gets practice in the art of verbal give-and-take. Try asking: What do you like most (or least) about school this year? How do you decide who your friends are? What makes the greatest person you know great? What excites (or worries) you most about the future? http://niswc.com/36kAC276091
about 1 month ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Is your teen sharing too much on social media? Teens often believe it is only their friends and followers who are looking at their social media posts. But data miners, identity thieves and other predators also look online for information they can use. Ask your teen to show you her social media profiles and privacy settings. If she hesitates, search for her online yourself. If she has been sharing personal information, discuss the consequences of letting it fall into the wrong hands. http://niswc.com/36jSC276091 _________________________________________________________________ For email/Facebook: Small changes can be early signs of struggles Sometimes, the biggest changes in your teen can show up in the smallest ways. So be alert. Notice what's normal for your teen and what's changed. Be alert for small changes in his schoolwork or grades, changes in his sleep patterns or a drop-off in contact with friends. If you see these signs, talk to your teen. Ask what's going on and how you can help. If needed, contact the teachers or the school counselor. http://niswc.com/36jXC276091
about 1 month ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Answer a teacher call with an open mind It’s hard not to imagine the worst possible scenario when the teacher contacts you about a problem with your child. But getting upset with the teacher or your child won't help. Instead, ask for more information and listen with an open mind. You'll probably find that the situation is not as bad as you assumed. When you know the specifics, it’s easier to work with the teacher to solve the problem. http://niswc.com/16jSC276091 ________________________________________________________________ Make a place for 'works in progress' You don't want your child's unfinished projects spread all over the house for weeks. But it's important not to make the preparation and cleanup so time-consuming that he puts off doing the project until the last minute. Find a space (the top of a bookcase, a box in the closet) where your child can store his unfinished project and supplies. Make it easy for him to pull the project out and work on it often. http://niswc.com/16jVC276091
about 1 month ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Share a five-day test preparation plan Before the next test, suggest that your teen try this five-day study plan. Four days before test day, have her gather notes, handouts and quizzes about the material. Three days before, she should study them and list questions that might be on the test. Two days before, your teen should review the textbook and make notes about how she would answer possible test questions. The day before, she should quiz herself to see if she can write the facts or apply the formulas. On test day, she can review her notes. http://niswc.com/36jQC276091 ____________________________________________________________________ Respond calmly and firmly to signs of alcohol use You weren't snooping, but you found a nearly empty bottle of liquor in your teen's room. Stay calm and ask your teen how it got there. He may accuse you of invading his privacy or tell you a story that's not quite true. Keep asking questions. Talk about the dangers of teen alcohol abuse, and say that you don't want your teen to be hurt. Then make it clear that underage drinking is illegal and you won't allow it. http://niswc.com/36jRC276091
about 2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Teach your teen to account for mistakes Responsibility includes being accountable for mistakes and their effects. Remind your teen that accountable people acknowledge their actions without making excuses or blaming others. Teach her that if she makes a mistake, she should apologize and say what she will do to prevent it from happening again. "I'm sorry I was late. Next time I won't wait until the last minute." http://niswc.com/36jKC276091 Sometimes, setting an example means apologizing Teens who have secure relationships with their families tend to do better in school. If you want to strengthen your relationship with your teen, set an example by making the first move. When you realize you have snapped at your teen, punished him out of anger or otherwise haven't been fair, pick a quiet moment and apologize. This isn't giving in, it is modeling a respectful relationship. http://niswc.com/36jFC276091
about 2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Encourage confidence with a special bouquet Encouragement helps kids become confident students. An "encouragement bouquet" is a fun way to remind your family to support one another. Put a vase in the middle of the table. With your child, attach paper cutout flowers to drinking straw stems. Then, whenever someone gives a compliment or word of encouragement to another family member, put a flower in the vase. The bouquet will be something special. http://niswc.com/16jKC276091
about 2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Don't fall prey to scholarship scams A scholarship is a great way for your teen to fund her education. But sometimes a scholarship can look like a better deal than it is. Don't trust any offer that asks you to pay a "small amount" to hold the scholarship. Real scholarships are free. Be cautious if an offer says your teen doesn't have to do a thing. Most scholarships require an application at least. Check out any offers with your teen's school counselor. http://niswc.com/36idC276091
2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Celebrate, support and reconnect at bedtime Is your family trying to do so many things that it is hard to keep track of one another, even in the same house? Stay connected by gathering each night in a child’s bedroom. Take turns sharing one positive thing from your day. Share a least favorite thing too, if you like. Your family will be able to celebrate the positives together and help one another deal with any tough stuff that comes along.
2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Be a coach, but let your teen run with the ball Your role in your teen's education is evolving, but it's just as important as ever. Instead of controlling the action, consider yourself a sideline coach. Support and encourage your teen's efforts to work independently by teaching him how to organize and plan his time. Ask specific questions about his assignments ("What reading to you have for history today?") that will help him focus on the tasks ahead. http://niswc.com/36iUC276091
2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Fathers, be a reading role model for boys Reading tests often show that boys lag behind girls in reading. One reason may be that moms do more reading aloud and elementary school teachers are often women. So boys may associate reading with women and school. Fathers can encourage their sons to read by showing them that books are for men, too. Give reading as much time as you do sports or other activities. http://niswc.com/16iVC276091
2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
This article is from Las Vegas Fox 5, KVVUTV Some Nevada families will receive a one-time payment after potentially missed school lunches due to COVID-19-related closures. The Nevada Department of Welfare and Supported Services announced that the families of children who would have received free or reduced lunch if school were in session will receive a one-time refund for the cost of the lunches. Eligible children include those who received food through the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and the School Breakfast Program (SBP). The refund is coming from the Pandemic Electronic Benefits Transfer Program offered through the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Families that receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) benefits will see a refund added to their current EBT card. All other eligible families will receive a new card via mail with funds already added to the card. Families do not need to apply to receive the benefit. “The benefits will be released automatically based on enrollment in free or reduced price school nutrition services," NDWSS administrator Steve Fisher said. The one-time payments will be issued between Aug. 31 through Sept. 8. Families with questions about the program can contact DWSS Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 775-684-8740 in Northern Nevada and 702-486-9640 in Southern Nevada. More information can be found at dwss.nv.gov. https://www.fox5vegas.com/news/education/nevada-families-to-receive-payment-to-replace-missed-school-lunches/article_ed49b950-f29e-11ea-9e3e-37b55c92484a.html
2 months ago, Nye County School District
School Lunch Program
Take conversations with your teen to the next level In his classes, your teen will be asked to support his answers and opinions with examples from his reading and experience. To help him practice this type of critical thinking, dive deep into your conversations. Take time to discuss your teen's thoughts about everything from school to issues in upcoming elections. Ask him to explain his thought process. You may not agree with him, but encourage him to think for himself. http://niswc.com/36iQC276091
3 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement