Point out the useful ways you read Children learn by watching their parents. And when you talk about what you are doing, you make it easier for your child to learn. If you are cooking, for example, you might say, "I'm looking for a cake recipe. I don't have time to read all the recipes in this cookbook, so I'm going to turn to the index in the back. Here under the letter C is a recipe for chocolate cake." Now your child understands more about how an index works. https://tpitip.com/?11gc8433 Muéstrele a su hijo los usos útiles de la lectura https://tpitip.com/?21gc8433
about 15 hours ago, Loretta Bivins
Help your teen relax and enjoy reading Older students are often uncomfortable if they don't read well. If this is true of your teen, don't force him to read aloud or insist he read grade-level material. Instead, let him choose material he likes. Keep a variety of interesting reading material around, and set an example by reading yourself. Look for audio versions of books he is reading so he can listen as he reads. If problems persist, ask the school to evaluate your teen for a reading disorder. https://tpitip.com/?31gV8433 Ayude a su joven a relajarse y disfrutar la lectura https://tpitip.com/?41gV8433
8 days ago, Loretta Bivins
Are your priorities on your schedule? It sounds odd, but it's true: It takes time to find time. As life resumes a more normal state, spend an hour reviewing your family's schedule. Does it reflect your priorities? If family comes first, for example, are you spending more time with family than anywhere else? Can you cut back on activities that interfere with your goals? This can be a challenge, but remember that kids would rather have time with their parents than material things. https://tpitip.com/?11gU8433 ¿Refleja su agenda cuáles son sus prioridades? https://tpitip.com/?21gU8433
9 days ago, Loretta Bivins
Inspire positive action with an ideas list Some teens have strong interests that keep them actively learning. But others need a little help from parents to get going, especially in the summer. Post a list of productive activities your teen can do when she's bored. Include a wide variety: listening to a podcast, writing a play, reading, or even finding the store with the best discount on an item she wants. Your teen will get the message that she must take action herself to get over being bored. https://tpitip.com/?31gP8433 Inspire actividades positivas con una lista de ideas https://tpitip.com/?41gP8433
14 days ago, Loretta Bivins
Challenge your child to some grocery games The next time you go food shopping with your child, play some grocery games. Ask a young child to name things that are round, or red or square. Challenge an older child to grocery math: If one can costs 29 cents, how much will two cans cost? How much change will be left from a dollar? Offer a reward by letting your "contestant" choose a favorite fruit to add to your shopping cart. https://tpitip.com/?11gN8433 Diviértanse en el supermercado con estos juegos https://tpitip.com/?21gN8433
16 days ago, Loretta Bivins
What kind of family atmosphere supports student success? Educators have identified several characteristics that are often shared by families of students who excel in school. These students often have families who encourage them to think and learn, and who show warmth and caring for one another. In these families, members share their thoughts and listen respectfully when the children express differences of opinion. These families also give students added responsibility for themselves as they grow up. https://tpitip.com/?31gG8433 ¿Qué tipo de ambiente familiar apoya el éxito de los estudiantes? https://tpitip.com/?41gG8433
23 days ago, Loretta Bivins
Teach your child this process for making wise decisions Whether your child is deciding which shirt to wear or whether she should go along with the crowd, four steps will help her make good choices. Have your child: 1. Stop and think about the decision she needs to make. 2. Identify all the possibilities. Sometimes kids think there are only two choices when there are many more. 3. Consider the consequences of each option. 4. Take your family's values into consideration. https://tpitip.com/?11gG8433 Enséñele a su hijo este proceso para tomar decisiones sensatas https://tpitip.com/?21gG8433
23 days ago, Loretta Bivins
Pack some learning into travel planning Do your family's summer plans include travel? Add some learning by including your child in the planning. You can ask her to research things you might see on your trip. Or give her a map and a highlighter and ask her to mark the route you will travel each day. Keep math facts fresh by having her calculate the distance in miles. Then let her choose an audiobook that your family can listen to in the car. https://tpitip.com/?11gC8433
27 days ago, Loretta Bivins
Conversation gaps give teens time to think Does your teen tune you out when you speak to her? Try this: Ask a question or make a comment. Then be silent. Teens need longer than adults do to process information. Your silence may seem awkward, especially when discussing important issues, but you will be more uncomfortable with it than your teen. She will be thinking. Give her a chance to tell you how she really feels, and you will gain insight into what she thinks. https://tpitip.com/?31fd8433 Las pausas en la conversación les dan tiempo a los jóvenes para pensar https://tpitip.com/?41fd8433
30 days ago, Loretta Bivins
Words aren't the only way to express love for your teen Your teen may cringe when you tell him you love him in front of his friends. But there are many ways to say it without words. For example: Laugh at his jokes. Ask about his daily activities. Stop what you're doing and listen when he talks. Ask for his advice sometimes. Notice and comment on the good things about his friends. Be on time when you are picking him up. All these things tell your teen you care. https://tpitip.com/?31fZ8433 Las palabras no son la única manera de expresar amor por su joven - https://tpitip.com/?41fZ8433
about 1 month ago, Loretta Bivins
Make learning part of the fun this summer To combine learning and fun this summer, try having a family spelling bee (give each family member words that are appropriate for their skills). Or add math to a family outing (How many miles until we get there? How much gas will we need? How many steps to climb the hill?). Ask questions about things you see in nature and try to find the answers. You can also tell family stories that connect history to your child's life. https://tpitip.com/?11fZ8433
about 1 month ago, Loretta Bivins
Express confidence in your teen's decision-making When teens hear the message that they can't do anything right, pretty soon they believe it. But when they hear the message that they can make good choices, they generally do. Does your teen have a tough choice to make? Remind him of times he chose well. Let him know you believe he will choose well this time, too. Chances are, he will. https://tpitip.com/?31fP8433
about 2 months ago, Loretta Bivins
Show your child the science in your home Your home is a wonderful science lab for your child. To promote scientific thinking, use a magnifying glass to view household items. What looks different and what looks similar with and without the glass? Ask questions and help your child look for answers: Which cereals get soggy in milk? You can also conduct some experiments: Will bread get moldy faster in a baggie in the refrigerator or in a baggie on the counter? https://tpitip.com/?11fN8433
about 2 months ago, Loretta Bivins
Monday, June 7, 2021 Adolescents often believe their parents never listen to them. It can make them stop talking to their parents. To really listen to your teen, avoid these common pitfalls: Focusing on what you are going to say next. Hearing only what you want to hear. Letting your mind wander. Comparing your teen to others. Belittling your teen's concerns. Agreeing with your teen just to be nice or avoid conflict. https://tpitip.com/?31fG8433 ______________________________________________________________ Wednesday, June 9, 2021 Use compromise to encourage responsibility In school and at home, teens are making the transition from being taken care of to taking care of themselves. Compromise can be an effective way to help your teen achieve her desires and fulfill her responsibilities. You might say, for example, "I know you want to watch a movie on Saturday evening. I can agree to that if you agree to finish your assignments on Saturday afternoon." https://tpitip.com/?31fI8433
about 2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Tuesday, June 8, 2021 Start a conversation with specific questions Sometimes conversations with children can be frustrating. "What did you do in class today?" you ask. "Nothing," your child replies. Don't give up! Try asking her more specific questions, such as "What was the best part of your day?" or "What are you studying in science?" Sometimes it works just to say, "What do you want to talk about?" You might be surprised by your child's answer! https://tpitip.com/?11fH8433 _____________________________________________________________ Sunday, June 13, 2021 Chores are rewarding, but should they be rewarded? Chores at home teach children many things that can help them in school, from time management to responsibility. But should you pay your child for doing chores? For everyday tasks, probably not. Kids should make their own contributions to keeping the family and home running smoothly. For big or extra jobs, consider assigning points that your child can accumulate and cash in for rewards. https://tpitip.com/?11fM8433
about 2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Monday, May 31, 2021 Help keep the focus on learning Teachers can't teach if they are busy disciplining students. To help make the most of the year's remaining learning time, talk with your student about school rules, and reinforce them at home. Emphasize the importance of respectful behavior, such as listening when others are talking. Make it clear that your teen should follow directions and avoid distracting the teacher or the other students. https://tpitip.com/?31ee8433 __________________________________________________________ Wednesday, June 2, 2021 Simple strategies help teens stay on track As your teen develops her skills at thinking ahead, planning and seeing assignments through, share some tips that will help: Encourage her to post all her deadlines on a calendar, make to-do lists and record all assignments in a planner. She should also double-check her plans with other family members. If she plans to drive to the store for project supplies, for example, she'll have to find another way if someone else has the car. https://tpitip.com/?31fB8433 ________________________________________________________ Saturday, June 5, 2021 Help your teen process disturbing current events Teens may be ready to learn complex material, but they may not be emotionally ready to handle upsetting current events. To help your teen process distressing news, steer her toward factual media sources and stay nearby as she watches or reads about it. Ask what she thinks about it, and offer to answer her questions or talk about concerns. Be sure to call your teen's attention to good news, too. https://tpitip.com/?31fE8433
about 2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Wednesday, June 2, 2021 Make sure your rules still fit your child When your child outgrows some clothing, it needs to be replaced. Children can also outgrow the limits parents set for them. That's why it's important to check regularly to see whether your rules still "fit." Remember that if you relax a boundary and your child doesn't respond well, you can always return to the way things were and try again in a few months. https://tpitip.com/?11fB8433 _____________________________________________________________ Friday, June 4, 2021 Don't save quality time for special occasions Something that is "quality" has value. But it isn't necessarily rare. Quality time, for example, just means putting extra effort into the time you have with your child. To make quality time an everyday event, offer your child your undivided attention frequently, even if just for a minute or two. Include your child in your household tasks. And allow time every day for fun, laughter and enjoying each other. https://tpitip.com/?11fD8433
about 2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Thursday, May 27, 2021 Lay out the ground rules for home-alone teens Teens are old enough to babysit siblings, and maybe even drive. But they still need guidelines if they will be home alone for periods of time during the day. Make sure your teen understands who is allowed in the house and who to call in an emergency. Discuss what he should tell callers who ask for you, and clearly describe what responsibilities he has around the house while you are gone. https://tpitip.com/?31ea8433 __________________________________________ Saturday, May 29, 2021 Make criticism easier for your teen to hear All parents must give their teens constructive criticism from time to time. But teens sometimes hear it as criticism of themselves, rather than their behavior. And if the people they respect most seem to be telling them they are bad, teens often will live up to that idea. When offering a correction, be clear that although you didn't like a particular action, you know that your teen is a good person who can make good choices. https://tpitip.com/?31ec8433
2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Wednesday, May 26, 2021 Kids love to relax in the summer. But they still need some structure to their day. Otherwise, they may spend hour after hour watching screens and never get around to activities that help them learn. Draw up a basic summer schedule for your child. Include large blocks of time for creative play. Build in time for reading and chores. And although you may relax rules on bedtime, don't give them up altogether. https://tpitip.com/?11eZ8433 _______________________________________ Friday, May 28, 2021 Help your child feel accepted, confident and purposeful Feeling confident and capable helps children cope with challenges. To nurture this kind of self-esteem in your child, say you love him all the time, not just when he's successful. Emphasize his strengths and point out his progress. Give him a sense of purpose by helping him set attainable goals. Then be sure to help him see that he can overcome difficulties, and tell him that you believe in his ability to succeed. https://tpitip.com/?11eb8433
2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Tuesday, May 18, 2021 Your teen has a lot to offer the world Some teens are focused entirely on their own needs and wants. Volunteering can help them learn to consider the needs of others. Could your teen organize or take part in a community project? Help an elderly person sign up online for a vaccine appointment? Work with an organization on solving an issue he feels strongly about? Helping others also gives teen a better understanding of their own value to the world. https://tpitip.com/?31eR8433 Sunday, May 23, 2021 Categorize rules to make them clear To be sure that your teen understands your rules, consider grouping them into three categories. Group A rules are absolutely firm. Most should be about safety, such as "Never text while driving." Group B rules can bend a bit (curfew can be later for a special event), but only if you and your teen agree in advance. Group C rules let your teen make choices (like what music to listen to in her free time) as long as they don't infringe on the rights of others. https://tpitip.com/?31eQ8433
2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement