How to help when your child is frustrated Statements like, "I hate school!" or "I'm dumb!" are often signs that a child is frustrated with schoolwork. To help your child in this situation, share a story of how you struggled with something when you were young. Explain how you worked through it. Ask guiding questions to help him come up with strategies he could use. Then encourage him to try again. If frustration persists, let the teacher know. http://niswc.com/16jZC276091
2 days ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Find out what your teen thinks When you ask your teen questions about what he thinks, not only do you show you care, you also learn more about his preferences, concerns and needs. And he gets practice in the art of verbal give-and-take. Try asking: What do you like most (or least) about school this year? How do you decide who your friends are? What makes the greatest person you know great? What excites (or worries) you most about the future? http://niswc.com/36kAC276091
2 days ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Is your teen sharing too much on social media? Teens often believe it is only their friends and followers who are looking at their social media posts. But data miners, identity thieves and other predators also look online for information they can use. Ask your teen to show you her social media profiles and privacy settings. If she hesitates, search for her online yourself. If she has been sharing personal information, discuss the consequences of letting it fall into the wrong hands. http://niswc.com/36jSC276091 _________________________________________________________________ For email/Facebook: Small changes can be early signs of struggles Sometimes, the biggest changes in your teen can show up in the smallest ways. So be alert. Notice what's normal for your teen and what's changed. Be alert for small changes in his schoolwork or grades, changes in his sleep patterns or a drop-off in contact with friends. If you see these signs, talk to your teen. Ask what's going on and how you can help. If needed, contact the teachers or the school counselor. http://niswc.com/36jXC276091
9 days ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Answer a teacher call with an open mind It’s hard not to imagine the worst possible scenario when the teacher contacts you about a problem with your child. But getting upset with the teacher or your child won't help. Instead, ask for more information and listen with an open mind. You'll probably find that the situation is not as bad as you assumed. When you know the specifics, it’s easier to work with the teacher to solve the problem. http://niswc.com/16jSC276091 ________________________________________________________________ Make a place for 'works in progress' You don't want your child's unfinished projects spread all over the house for weeks. But it's important not to make the preparation and cleanup so time-consuming that he puts off doing the project until the last minute. Find a space (the top of a bookcase, a box in the closet) where your child can store his unfinished project and supplies. Make it easy for him to pull the project out and work on it often. http://niswc.com/16jVC276091
9 days ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Share a five-day test preparation plan Before the next test, suggest that your teen try this five-day study plan. Four days before test day, have her gather notes, handouts and quizzes about the material. Three days before, she should study them and list questions that might be on the test. Two days before, your teen should review the textbook and make notes about how she would answer possible test questions. The day before, she should quiz herself to see if she can write the facts or apply the formulas. On test day, she can review her notes. http://niswc.com/36jQC276091 ____________________________________________________________________ Respond calmly and firmly to signs of alcohol use You weren't snooping, but you found a nearly empty bottle of liquor in your teen's room. Stay calm and ask your teen how it got there. He may accuse you of invading his privacy or tell you a story that's not quite true. Keep asking questions. Talk about the dangers of teen alcohol abuse, and say that you don't want your teen to be hurt. Then make it clear that underage drinking is illegal and you won't allow it. http://niswc.com/36jRC276091
16 days ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Teach your teen to account for mistakes Responsibility includes being accountable for mistakes and their effects. Remind your teen that accountable people acknowledge their actions without making excuses or blaming others. Teach her that if she makes a mistake, she should apologize and say what she will do to prevent it from happening again. "I'm sorry I was late. Next time I won't wait until the last minute." http://niswc.com/36jKC276091 Sometimes, setting an example means apologizing Teens who have secure relationships with their families tend to do better in school. If you want to strengthen your relationship with your teen, set an example by making the first move. When you realize you have snapped at your teen, punished him out of anger or otherwise haven't been fair, pick a quiet moment and apologize. This isn't giving in, it is modeling a respectful relationship. http://niswc.com/36jFC276091
23 days ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Encourage confidence with a special bouquet Encouragement helps kids become confident students. An "encouragement bouquet" is a fun way to remind your family to support one another. Put a vase in the middle of the table. With your child, attach paper cutout flowers to drinking straw stems. Then, whenever someone gives a compliment or word of encouragement to another family member, put a flower in the vase. The bouquet will be something special. http://niswc.com/16jKC276091
23 days ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Don't fall prey to scholarship scams A scholarship is a great way for your teen to fund her education. But sometimes a scholarship can look like a better deal than it is. Don't trust any offer that asks you to pay a "small amount" to hold the scholarship. Real scholarships are free. Be cautious if an offer says your teen doesn't have to do a thing. Most scholarships require an application at least. Check out any offers with your teen's school counselor. http://niswc.com/36idC276091
about 1 month ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Celebrate, support and reconnect at bedtime Is your family trying to do so many things that it is hard to keep track of one another, even in the same house? Stay connected by gathering each night in a child’s bedroom. Take turns sharing one positive thing from your day. Share a least favorite thing too, if you like. Your family will be able to celebrate the positives together and help one another deal with any tough stuff that comes along.
about 1 month ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Be a coach, but let your teen run with the ball Your role in your teen's education is evolving, but it's just as important as ever. Instead of controlling the action, consider yourself a sideline coach. Support and encourage your teen's efforts to work independently by teaching him how to organize and plan his time. Ask specific questions about his assignments ("What reading to you have for history today?") that will help him focus on the tasks ahead. http://niswc.com/36iUC276091
about 1 month ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Fathers, be a reading role model for boys Reading tests often show that boys lag behind girls in reading. One reason may be that moms do more reading aloud and elementary school teachers are often women. So boys may associate reading with women and school. Fathers can encourage their sons to read by showing them that books are for men, too. Give reading as much time as you do sports or other activities. http://niswc.com/16iVC276091
about 1 month ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
This article is from Las Vegas Fox 5, KVVUTV Some Nevada families will receive a one-time payment after potentially missed school lunches due to COVID-19-related closures. The Nevada Department of Welfare and Supported Services announced that the families of children who would have received free or reduced lunch if school were in session will receive a one-time refund for the cost of the lunches. Eligible children include those who received food through the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and the School Breakfast Program (SBP). The refund is coming from the Pandemic Electronic Benefits Transfer Program offered through the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Families that receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) benefits will see a refund added to their current EBT card. All other eligible families will receive a new card via mail with funds already added to the card. Families do not need to apply to receive the benefit. “The benefits will be released automatically based on enrollment in free or reduced price school nutrition services," NDWSS administrator Steve Fisher said. The one-time payments will be issued between Aug. 31 through Sept. 8. Families with questions about the program can contact DWSS Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 775-684-8740 in Northern Nevada and 702-486-9640 in Southern Nevada. More information can be found at dwss.nv.gov. https://www.fox5vegas.com/news/education/nevada-families-to-receive-payment-to-replace-missed-school-lunches/article_ed49b950-f29e-11ea-9e3e-37b55c92484a.html
about 1 month ago, Nye County School District
School Lunch Program
Take conversations with your teen to the next level In his classes, your teen will be asked to support his answers and opinions with examples from his reading and experience. To help him practice this type of critical thinking, dive deep into your conversations. Take time to discuss your teen's thoughts about everything from school to issues in upcoming elections. Ask him to explain his thought process. You may not agree with him, but encourage him to think for himself. http://niswc.com/36iQC276091
about 1 month ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
There are still lots of ways to get involved How can you volunteer for the school if you work? What if school buildings aren't open? There are still many ways to make a difference. For example, you can stay in touch with your child's teacher and respond to school surveys. You may be able to offer career expertise or help translate for non-English speaking parents. Your participation helps in important ways and shows your child that education is a priority. http://niswc.com/16iPC276091
about 1 month ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Have your teen chart causes and effects of history If your teen has trouble remembering what he reads for history class, he may have trouble picking out what is most important in the text. Making a cause and effect chart can help. Have him list these questions down one side of the chart: What is the problem? What or who caused the problem? What solutions were tried? What was the result? Which solution worked? What happened? As he reads, he can fill in the answers. http://niswc.com/36iKC276091
about 2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Clear rules help avoid arguments You have a better chance of eliminating conflict between you and your child if you pick a calm, unhurried time to discuss any issue you are having. Then agree on a rule to address the issue in the future. For example, he must finish schoolwork before having recreational screen time. Post the rule where you both can see it. When the situation next arises, you can just point to the rule and avoid an argument. http://niswc.com/16iMC276091
about 2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Online or in person, attendance still matters Whatever format his classes take this year, make it clear to your teen that you expect him to participate fully in every one. He may think he is just getting out of some work when he cuts class. Make sure he knows that he may also be cutting himself out of future opportunities. Explain that unexcused absences may be included on his permanent record, for upper level programs, colleges and prospective employers to see. http://niswc.com/36heC276091
about 2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Learn how to contact key school personnel In these uncertain times, family-school communication is more important than ever. Families need to know who they can turn to with questions. Do you know the name of the school principal? Your child's counselor? The nurse? If not, call the office or look on the website to find out who they are and how to contact them. Making connections with key people at school helps smooth your child's education journey.
about 2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
I want to give a huge shout-out and thank-you to the NNSS for providing us with funding for 50 in-home hot-spots to provide to our families that do not have internet. We received the funding on Thursday, and I placed the order on Friday! https://www.nnss.gov/pages/News/news.html
2 months ago, Robert Williams, Director of Technology
Nevada National Security Site
Find out about higher education options Your teen may be focused on the beginning of school, but it's not too early to start thinking about higher education. Does your teen enjoy designing, making and repairing things? Is she interested in contributing to a business? If so, she may want to consider going to a technical, business or trade school. You and your teen can discuss an array of post-graduation education options with her counselor. http://niswc.com/36hYC276091
2 months ago, NCSD Parent Engagement