Saturday, January 30, 2021 Suggest activities to promote writing Strong writing skills help teens in almost every subject in school. Help your teen find engaging ways to practice. He might enjoy writing stories for a younger sibling, writing captions for family photos, writing letters to request free samples or materials, or keeping a journal. These activities are meant to be fun. If your teen isn't interested, keep providing chances to write until one appeals to him. http://niswc.com/37adC276091 __________________________________________________________ Friday, January 29, 2021 Three preparation strategies lead to better essays Your teen will face many essay tests and timed writing assignments in her school career. Share these tips for success on them: 1. Do the research. Your teen may not know the essay topic, but she can identify several examples from the material that could apply to a variety of themes. 2. Make an outline. Opening paragraph, two to three examples and a conclusion. 3. Memorize a quote or two that could be useful in different contexts. http://niswc.com/37acC276091
about 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Wednesday, January 27, 2021 Create silly sentences to make facts memorable Studying for a test usually involves memorizing. Your child can remember lists of items by writing a sentence using words that begin with the first letter of each word in the list. For example, the first letter of each word in "My Very Educated Mother Just Served Us Noodles" stands for the first letters of the planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. http://niswc.com/17aaC276091 _____________________________________________________________ Thursday, January 28, 2021 One activity will help your child every day - One of the most important things you can do to help your child succeed in school is to read aloud together. It introduces young children to the world of books, and even older kids love to be read to. Make reading aloud together a daily priority. To keep it interesting, be sure to read books you enjoy. And sometimes, build your child's vocabulary by reading books that are a little too hard for him to read alone. http://niswc.com/17abC276091
about 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Let experience reinforce lessons in self-discipline When teens think of discipline, they often think of parents and teachers correcting misbehavior. But the most effective kind of discipline is actually self-discipline. To encourage it, give your teen a say in setting his own study schedule. Then let him experience the consequences of his actions. If he puts off doing a project, don't help him do it at the last minute. http://niswc.com/37aXC276091 ____________________________________________________________ Challenge your teen to argue in writing It's important for students to consider the different sides of an argument before taking a side. To provide practice, challenge your teen to write a persuasive letter to an elected official expressing an opinion on a topic. Your teen will need to research the topic in order to explain why one viewpoint makes more sense than the others. It's a real-world way to build thinking and writing skills. http://niswc.com/37aWC276091
about 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Honor Dr. King by teaching respect for others As you celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, talk with your child about the importance of treating people with respect. It's the basis for other desirable behaviors. Common courtesies, like saying "Thank you" and "Excuse me" are done out of respect. Trying to understand other people's viewpoints and differences is another respectful courtesy, as is being honest and not deceiving, cheating or stealing from others. http://niswc.com/17aRC276091 __________________________________________________________ Create a newspaper your child will love Newspapers aren't typically something young children choose to read. To engage your child, try making a newspaper based on his interests. Collect articles about his hobbies, school and neighborhood. Glue the articles to pages from a real newspaper, and give him his own "edition" to read while you read the rest of the paper. Then discuss articles you each find interesting. http://niswc.com/17aWC276091
about 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
eRate, Category 2 - 470 RFP - January 2021 View Here: https://5il.co/oggq
about 3 years ago, Robert Williams, Director of Technology
Discuss violence prevention with your teen Preventing conflict and violence is a top priority for schools. And families play a key part. Talking to your teen on a regular basis is an essential first step. To begin a family dialogue about violence and safety, ask questions such as, "What makes you feel safe?" or "What are ways to solve a problem without hurting anyone?" Listen carefully to your teen's answers. Make it clear that you take this issue seriously. http://niswc.com/37aQC276091
about 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Encourage scientific thinking with a 'laundry lab' Doing laundry can be more than just a chore. It can also teach your child science skills, such as observing and classifying. Scientists notice details. Ask your child, "Does this towel feel different from that one? Why could that be?" Scientists also put things in groups. Help your child sort the laundry by color, size or family member. Challenge her to come up with a new way to "classify" clothes. http://niswc.com/17aQC276091
about 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Help your teen make the most of winter break Your teen may be looking forward to relaxing over winter break. But staying on a regular schedule will make returning to a school schedule in January easier. Encourage your teen to limit sleeping in to one hour past his normal wake up time. Then have him schedule some time each day for reading, studying, writing and creating. http://niswc.com/36lPC276091
about 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Listen to your child…and to the teacher It's important for children to feel heard and believed. If your child tells you something the teacher did that seems unkind or unfair, you should listen. But don't assume the incident is as bad as it sounds. If you are concerned by what your child says, contact the teacher. Calmly express your concern and ask for the teacher's point of view. If there's a problem, work together to solve it. http://niswc.com/16lOC276091
about 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Help your teen sort out priorities Sometimes teens face competing priorities. "Should I watch the show everyone's talking about or work on my science project?" To help your teen choose, write things that matter to her on separate notecards (having a lot of friends, excelling at soccer, getting good grades, etc.) Have her rank the cards from most to least important. Discuss her choices and your family's values. Then when she faces a choice, she can refer to her ranking. http://niswc.com/36lMC276091
about 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Preserve the memories of an unusual year Let your child know you think she's special by making her a school memory book. Collect mementos like photos of your child working at home, the super-hard math problem she finally solved, etc. In the spring, lay them on the floor in chronological order and let her choose what she wants to include to remember this unusual school year. Put the items in a scrapbook. If you do it each year, your child will have a collection to be proud of. http://niswc.com/16lJC276091
about 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
We partnered with @DonorsChoose to help our teachers fund more of their projects. Check out the new landing page for more information! www.donorschoose.org/nyecountyschooldistrict
about 3 years ago, Nye County School District
Donor Choose
Keep your teen's online life from causing school trouble Many teens record their personal thoughts in blogs, videos or social media posts. But these are not the same as a private diary. They can be read by people all over the internet. To avoid trouble at school, make sure your teen knows she should never post (even as a joke) threats to harm school staff, students or property. This includes harming a person's reputation. She should never suggest breaking the law. And unless assigned to do so by a teacher, she should avoid posting during school hours or on school computers. http://niswc.com/36kZC276091
over 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Team up with the teacher to tackle problems By now, you are probably aware of any issues your child is having with school and learning. But you may not always know how to address them. Her teacher is ready to help. Ask for a conference, in person, online or over the phone. Share your concerns and ask what the teacher has observed. Together, plan what you and the school can do to help. If necessary, meet again. Never give up on your child. http://niswc.com/16kWC276091
over 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
How to boost social skills while social distancing Many parents are wondering how their children can develop social skills during a pandemic. But many of these important social skills can be taught at home. Role-play being friendly, honest and a good listener with your child. When you play games together, teach her to be a good sport. You can promote skills like cooperation and compromise by doing projects together, such as making a family dinner. http://niswc.com/16kPC276091 _______________________________________________________________ Ask your child to help with holiday plans Don't worry if you can't reproduce past holiday celebrations this year. Instead, create some new traditions with your child. Participating in family rituals gives kids a sense of belonging. Together, decide what you will eat and what to do for family fun. Plan decorations your child can make. Think about ways everyone can help prepare and clean up. Your child will get a boost from seeing plans through and helping the family. http://niswc.com/16kUC276091
over 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Recharge your teen's fading motivation It's not uncommon for students' motivation to decline a few months into the school year. To revive your teen's momentum, encourage him to set small, achievable goals. Suggest that he choose a small reward, such as texting a friend or taking a quick walk, that he will give himself when he finishes a task. And urge him to set and live up to personal standards. He should strive to do his best, not just enough to get by. http://niswc.com/36kJC276091 __________________________________________________________________ Know what to do if your teen faces suspension If you learn that your teen could be suspended, what should you do? Know the school rules. Get the facts of the matter, from both the school and your teen. Keep records, such as letters from the school and notes of your discussions. They will be helpful if the problem continues. But don't get angry or be in denial. Your teen may really need help. And don't panic. Most suspended students never break the rules again. http://niswc.com/36kLC276091
over 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Support your child through fourth grade challenges Fourth grade can be a challenge for elementary school students. In the early grades, teachers focus on basic skills. But in fourth grade, students must use what they know. They generally tackle bigger projects and do more writing. To support your child, stay positive and establish a regular study time. Encourage him to set weekly goals and break big assignments into smaller chunks. http://niswc.com/16kIC276091 __________________________________________________________________ Make time for fun, relaxing reading Helping with schoolwork isn't the only way to support your child's education. One of the best things you can do is to encourage him to read for fun and relaxation. Print out a story he can read in the bathtub. Cozy up under a blanket and read by flashlight. To find more time, limit recreational screen time and offer reading as a replacement. The first two weeks may be hard, but it will get easier. http://niswc.com/16kOC276091
over 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
In school or online, every class matters Teens don't decide to drop out of school in just one day. They check out little by little, until they feel so disconnected that they decide not to return. It usually starts with skipping classes. If your teen has started skipping, talk to her about the importance attending every class. Express your confidence in her ability to learn, and if she's struggling, encourage her to work with the teacher to get back on track. http://niswc.com/36kEC276091 _____________________________________________________________________ For email/Facebook: Help your teen relax about math tests Math tests make many students anxious. Knowing some test-taking strategies can help. Tell your teen to look the test over before beginning to answer, and to put checks beside problems he knows he can do. He should solve those problems first. If he gets stuck on a problem when doing the rest, he should move on until he's answered everything he can. Remind your teen that he'll get the most credit if he shows all his work. http://niswc.com/36kFC276091
over 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
Three daily ways to support your child From day to day, you may be helping your child with schoolwork in many different ways. But three things, according to research, will help every day. The first is making class attendance a priority, whether your child is learning at home or at school. The second is reading together. The third is managing recreational screen time. When the school day is over, turn off the screens and encourage your child to read, play games, exercise or think. http://niswc.com/16kBC276091 ____________________________________________________________________ Accomplishment is worth a little struggle If you rush to solve your child's every problem, you send the message that you don't think he can manage by himself. When kids work problems out for themselves, it makes them feel competent and confident. That's why sometimes, it's best to let your child struggle through a problem on his own. Offer support and encouragement ("I know you can figure this out"), and then give him some space. http://niswc.com/16kEC276091
over 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement
How to help when your child is frustrated Statements like, "I hate school!" or "I'm dumb!" are often signs that a child is frustrated with schoolwork. To help your child in this situation, share a story of how you struggled with something when you were young. Explain how you worked through it. Ask guiding questions to help him come up with strategies he could use. Then encourage him to try again. If frustration persists, let the teacher know. http://niswc.com/16jZC276091
over 3 years ago, NCSD Parent Engagement